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Witch Bottle

goddessofpurple:

To make a witch bottle, you must first select the bottle you want to use. Your bottle may be clear or tinted. If you’re working with a colored bottle, choose a color that suits what you are doing. Tinted bottles are great for spells that use color correspondences. Once you have a bottle, wash it with warm soapy water, or cleanse it in the ocean. After you have washed it, magickally cleanse it, and bathe it in the light of the full moon. When the bottle is clean, it is time to fill it. There are a lot of options when it comes to contents. Here are a few examples:

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archaicwonder:

Witch Bottle, England, Circa 16th-17th Century

Witch Bottles, like this one, were often made from Bellarmine jars which were originally used to transport wine from north Germany to England in the 16th and 17th centuries. The jars were then reused to make Witch Bottles which were filled with urine, fingernails, hair, and iron nails and then hidden to protect the occupants of the house against a dreaded witch’s curse.
Urine was an important ingredient, but actual discoveries of bottles still containing urine are rare. However, all of the Witch Bottles found in England which were tested for urine, came back positive. Other traditional items contained in the bottles include bones, thorns, needles, wood and pieces of cloth. The Witch Bottle’s contents were designed to not only stop a witch’s attack, but to torment her as well.
The bottles have most often been found buried under fireplaces. The fireplace has a direct connection to the sky above so it was believed that a witch’s curse or even a witch in shape-shifting form could get in through the fireplace. Other places bottles were hidden include under the floorboards, inside walls, by doorways and under windowsills. Basically any area of a home where a spirit was thought to be able to enter was a good spot for a Witch Bottle. They had to be hidden well because once found, they lost their intended effect.
The bottles eventually came to be known as Bellarmine jars. They were nicknamed after Cardinal Roberto Francesco Romolo Bellarmino (1542 – 1621), even though they were being produced before his time. The bearded man’s image on the bottles resembled the cardinal’s appearance and were thus satirically named “Bellarmine jars” in reference to him. Later on, the bearded man on the bottles was said to represent the Devil, which was fitting because after all, witches were considered to be the allies of the Devil at that time.
One of the earliest descriptions of the a Witch Bottle appears in 1681 in Joseph Glanvill’s Saducismus Triumphatus, which can be read free online here.
More about Witch Bottles…

archaicwonder:

Witch Bottle, England, Circa 16th-17th Century

Witch Bottles, like this one, were often made from Bellarmine jars which were originally used to transport wine from north Germany to England in the 16th and 17th centuries. The jars were then reused to make Witch Bottles which were filled with urine, fingernails, hair, and iron nails and then hidden to protect the occupants of the house against a dreaded witch’s curse.

Urine was an important ingredient, but actual discoveries of bottles still containing urine are rare. However, all of the Witch Bottles found in England which were tested for urine, came back positive. Other traditional items contained in the bottles include bones, thorns, needles, wood and pieces of cloth. The Witch Bottle’s contents were designed to not only stop a witch’s attack, but to torment her as well.

The bottles have most often been found buried under fireplaces. The fireplace has a direct connection to the sky above so it was believed that a witch’s curse or even a witch in shape-shifting form could get in through the fireplace. Other places bottles were hidden include under the floorboards, inside walls, by doorways and under windowsills. Basically any area of a home where a spirit was thought to be able to enter was a good spot for a Witch Bottle. They had to be hidden well because once found, they lost their intended effect.

The bottles eventually came to be known as Bellarmine jars. They were nicknamed after Cardinal Roberto Francesco Romolo Bellarmino (1542 – 1621), even though they were being produced before his time. The bearded man’s image on the bottles resembled the cardinal’s appearance and were thus satirically named “Bellarmine jars” in reference to him. Later on, the bearded man on the bottles was said to represent the Devil, which was fitting because after all, witches were considered to be the allies of the Devil at that time.

One of the earliest descriptions of the a Witch Bottle appears in 1681 in Joseph Glanvill’s Saducismus Triumphatus, which can be read free online here.

More about Witch Bottles…